What is the calling code for Australia? Making your phonecall.

20.12.17
4 minute read
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The Land Down Under is a popular destination for tourists from all over the world, as well as expats. With bustling cities and stunning natural scenery, it’s no wonder people are flocking to Australia. But what if you need to get ahold of one of them? How do you call an Aussie? Read on to find out how to place a call to the Land Down Under.

How do I call Australia?

Every country in the world has a different country code that must be dialed before a local phone number. Without them, phone numbers would have to be far too long for people to memorize, simply so there could be enough phone numbers for everyone in the world.

Are there other codes in Australia I need to be aware of?

Australia has a handful of area codes that you must dial to reach certain regions of the country.

Australia also has an area code for all mobile phones. To call a mobile phone from Australia, you must dial the country code, followed by 04 and the mobile phone number.

When calling from outside Australia, leave off the “0” in the area code.

For example, if calling a mobile phone from outside Australia, you would dial +61 4 and the 8-digit mobile number.

An example of an Australian phone number

If you see: (*02) 3456 7890*, then dial +61 2 3456 7890.

Calling Australia from a landline

When calling a foreign country from a landline, you won’t be able to dial the “+” before the country code, so you use an international call prefix instead. These vary depending on where you’re calling from, but some of the most common are:

UK, Italy, China 00
United States or Canada 011
Japan 010

For a full list of international call prefixes, click here.

Why did my call to Australia not work?

If your call to Australia isn’t going through, troubleshoot with these tips:

  • Make sure the local number you’re dialing is correct.
  • Make sure you’re using the correct dialing format (your country’s exit code, Australia’s country code, the area code, then the local number)
  • Make sure you leave off the “0” in the area code if you’re calling from outside Australia.

Another way to make a call to Australia is to use an app, like Whatsapp or Skype. Whatsapp offers free calls, and Skype allows you to pre-load the app with credits for making international calls (calls via the app to another Skype user are free).

Do phone numbers in Australia usually have voicemail boxes?

Australian landlines don’t have built-in voicemail boxes. However, in 2017, more and more Australians are trading their landlines for mobile phones, which typically do have voicemail boxes. Sometimes they're personalized by the user, and sometimes they use a generic message. That’s entirely up to the phone owner.

What does the ringing tone sound like when you call Australia?

If you live in the United States, Australia’s ringing tone and busy signal won’t sound too different to you. The dial tone, however, may throw you off at first.

Australia’s dial tone sounds similar to a ringing tone, but is one long, continuous tone. After you successfully dial a number, the ringing tone will sound exactly the same, but in sets of two short bursts of sound.

If you hear alternating beeping noises (one loud followed by one softer followed by one loud, etc., etc.), it means there was an error placing your call. You’ll need to hang up and try dialing again. If you hear continuous beeping noises with consistent volume, the number you’ve dialed is busy. You can try calling that number again later.

If you don’t dial the number correctly, you may get a recorded message saying, “Your call could not be connected. Please check the number, and try again.”

You can often hear each of these sounds in a video by searching youtube.

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Calling foreign countries can be tricky until you get the hang of it. But with this guide in hand, your cross-country communication should hopefully seem a little more simple.

This publication is provided for general information purposes only and is not intended to cover every aspect of the topics which it deals. It is not intended to amount to advice on which you should rely. You must obtain professional or specialist advice before taking, or refraining from, any action on the basis of the content in this publication. The information in this publication does not constitute legal, tax or other professional advice from TransferWise Limited or its affiliates. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. We make no representations, warranties or guarantees, whether express or implied, that the content is the publication is accurate, complete or up to date.

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