9 things Canadians living in the U.S will miss about Canada

14.12.16
3 minute read
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Candian in the U.S.? You’re in good company - there are more than 800,000 Canadians who’ve made the trip across the border.

But no matter how much you enjoy living in a different country, there will always be certain things that you miss about home.

We spoke to a few TransferWise customers to round up a few of the things that Canadians living in the U.S. miss the most.


The Four Seasons

trees

Depending on where you live in America, you may be stuck living in the same season year-round.

But in Canada, no matter which province you live in, Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter are always on their way.

Jeff, a Canadian expat living in Arizona, was surprised at how much he missed the snow.

“For me, winter is my least favorite season. But after living in Phoenix for the past three years, I really miss seeing the leaves change in the fall and having snow on the ground for Christmas.”


Colour-coded Currency

currency

Unlike America’s often indistinguishable banknotes, Canadian currency’s wisely colour-coded so that you can easily spot which bill you’re looking for.

And it's more fun too, we guess. Nice.


Universal Health Care

If you’re a Canadian living in America, then chances are at some point you’ll need to go to the hospital.

Just don’t be surprised when they hand you an enormous bill at the end. In Canada, everyone has access to universal health care and they never have to pay out of pocket to see a Doctor. In a nutshell - make sure you've sorted out your insurance ASAP.

Rachel, a Canadian expat living in the U.S, explains:

“Back home, health care’s provided through taxes and the government, so any resident can go to the hospital for free. Needless to say I was really shocked when I broke my wrist water skiing in Vermont and was responsible for paying a lengthy and expensive hospital bill.”


Caesars

caesars

A morning vodka drink that pairs perfectly with breakfast? Yes please!

Caesars (which are often compared to Bloody Mary’s) trade tomato juice for Clamato juice and it makes all the difference.

Needless to say, Caesars are a national favourite in Canada and are surprisingly tough to find south of the border.


Poutine

poutine
Take fresh hand-cut PEI fries, top them with rich Quebec cheese curd and smother it all with piping hot gravy. You've got Poutine.

Ask any Canadian and they’ll tell you that poutine’s a national delicacy that can’t be properly replicated outside of the country.


Tim Hortons on Every Corner

timhortons

Whether you go for the coffee or go for the donuts, Tim Hortons coffee shop is adored by most Canadians.

And if you consider that 8 out of every 10 coffees in Canada are poured by Timmies, there’s never a shop too far away.


Hockey Night in Canada

hockeycanada

In America, there are plenty of professional sports to follow. But in Canada, there’s only one that matters: Hockey.

There’s also only one way to enjoy it on a Saturday night: By tuning in to Hockey Night in Canada with Ron Maclean.


The Metric System

metricsystem

How do you convert celsius to fahrenheit again?

After growing up in Canada and using kilometers to measure distance and celsius to measure temperature, Canadians are likely to miss the simplicity of driving 100 kilometers an hour in 25 degree celsius weather.


May 2-4 Weekend

victoriaday

Americans have some great holidays, but nothing quite beats May 2-4 in Canada.

Known across the country as Victoria Day weekend, May 2-4 is the first long weekend of Spring and tends to signal that warmer months are on their way.

Johnny, a Canadian expat living in California explains why it’s his favorite holiday.

“Even more than Canada day, I always miss home on May 2-4. Mostly because that’s the weekend when my family re-opens our cottage for the summer and I have fond memories of being there with bonfires, beers and good company.”


Moving money back to Canada, or over to the U.S.? Don't get stung with a bad exchange rate.

TransferWise charges just 1% or 0.7% over $5,000, far less than that wire fee your bank offers.

And most importantly, we never use a mark-up on the exchange rate (unlike a bank or broker) - so you'll receive far more money than you would if you used your bank. (Rate mark-ups...? What are we talking about?) Take a look:

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Want to know more on that? Here's the math.

TransferWise is the smart, new way to send money abroad.

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