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How do I find my ACH routing number?

In order to withdraw funds from your U.S. account using the Federal ACH network, you will need to have two account details at hand; your ACH routing number and account number. These help TransferWise withdraw funds from the right account.
 

Option 1: Look at your checkbook
















If you have your checkbook at hand, have a look at the illustration above for how to locate these details.
 

Option 2: Find the routing number on your bank's website

Your routing number is associated with your bank and it's location. One bank may have many different routing numbers for different locations, so here's a guide on how to find the correct number.

Please select the bank of your choice:

Bank of America
Capital One
Chase
Citibank
PNC Bank
SunTrust
TD Bank
U.S. Bank
Wells Fargo

Other banks

Find something that’s missing or not accurate? Please let us know!

 

Bank of America

Bank of America offers a guide online; simply visit the guide, select your State and locate the number called "Electronic (ex. Direct Deposit/Automatic Payment)".

Please note - The routing number, 026009593, is a wire routing number, and will not work for ACH payments from BoA.
 

Capital One

With Capital One you might have to to log into your internet banking or contact the bank to get the correct number. Once logged into the internet bank, the routing number should be available under the "Account Details & Transactions page".
 

Chase

Chase offers a list online, simply visit this FAQ page and look up the number for the region where you opened the account.
 

Citibank

Citibank offers a list online, simply visit this FAQ page and look up the number (called ABA number) for the region where you opened the account.
 

PNC Bank

PNC Bank offers a guide on how to find the right details. Visit this page and then locate the section called "Where can I find my full Account and Routing Number?" for more info.
 

SunTrust

SunTrust has a new "universal ACH Routing Transit number", which you can find on this FAQ page. (If you choose to follow their instructions on how to find the number on your checks on that page, please note that it's the "3: ACH Routing Transit Number" that you're after.)
 

TD Bank

TD Bank offers a list online, simply visit this FAQ page and look up the number for the region where you opened the account.
 

U.S. Bank

For Checking accounts; U.S. Bank offers a list online, simply visit this FAQ page, scroll down the page and look up the number for the region where you opened the account.
 
For Savings accounts; please contact the U.S. Bank support team, as no list is available online.
 

Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo offers a guide online; simply visit the guide and answer the questions about your account to find your routing number.

On the question "Will you be using this information to receive a wire transfer?", select "No" to make sure you get the right number.
 

Other banks

We unfortunately can’t keep instructions up to date for everyone, but here are some general rules of thumb: 

1. The information is printed on your checkbook, see our illustration above for how to find it.
2. You can most likely find the information on your bank's website.
3. With some banks you may find the information by logging into your internet banking, see more info below.
4. You can always contact your bank to find the information. To get the right routing number, the easiest is to ask for the "Electronic ACH routing number" and to include information about which State you opened your account in.

 

Option 3: Log into your internet banking

You can usually find these details by logging into your internet bank. From there you should easily be able to see your accounts and the account number of the account you would like to use (this number can be up 17 digits long).

To find the routing number, you might have to click your way to detailed information about the account. The number you're looking for is 9 digits long, and usually called "Routing number", "Electronic ABA routing number", "ACH routing number" or "Routing/Transit number" but the description varies from bank to bank.

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